We can overcome undernutrition: 9 case studies

Bangladesh Case Study download pdf

The case of Bangladesh shows that dramatic progress on nutrition can be achieved, even in partner countries with a low per capita income. At the same time, it is clear that significant additional support will be required to put an end to undernutrition in the long term. As things stand Bangladesh remains off course in terms of meeting key Global WHA targets for stunting, wasting, overweight and anaemia.

Ethiopia Case Study download pdf

Ethiopia is the second-most populous country in Africa with a population of 87 million. In just over 20 years Ethiopia has reduced the prevalence of stunting (chronic undernutrition) in children under-five years of age from 67% to 40%. No other country in Africa has matched this achievement, although few have started from such a low base. This has been a major contributing factor to Ethiopia’s impressive performance in reducing child mortality1. However, even if this trend continues, Ethiopia will still fall short of its own commitment to reduce stunting by 20% by 2020. 40% prevalence of stunting is still above the sub-Saharan average and in absolute numbers represents today about 6 million children.

Guatemala Case Study download pdf

Guatemala shows an unprecedented national movement —legal, political and institutional— towards making the fight against chronic undernutrition a top State commitment for human development and poverty reduction. The 2012 Zero Hunger Pact1 sets to reduce 10% of child stunting by end 2015 and its operational plan provides the accountability framework. With 1 out of 2 children in Guatemala stunted, chronic undernutrition is the most serious problem afflicting the nation and carries strong negative effects on human capital and economic productivity. Clearly, putting an end to this scourge in the long term will require significant additional support. Not only Guatemala’s progress against global WHA targets for stunting andn anaemia remain off course, but the country faces emerging problems of obesity and chronic diseases.

 Zimbabwe Case Study download pdf

Despite the attention raised through the first global International Conference on Nutrition (ICN) in 1992, the prevalence of stunting in Zimbabwe still deteriorated from the early 1990s through until 2009. This has been a turbulent period in Zimbabwe’s history characterised by economic decline, rampant inflation and food shortages. Today, despite some very recent improvements, the level of stunting still affects more than one in four children, but with population growth, this affects many more children than it did in 1992. Today, fewer than one in five Zimbabwean children at the critical age of 6 to 23 months receive a minimum acceptable diet and nearly one in two rural households lacks access to a toilet facility leading to poor sanitary conditions.

Rwanda Case Study download pdf

A recent global report recognised Rwanda as one of the countries that is leading the way in nutrition. This largely comes down to a clear vision; committed government leaders ready to take the challenge seriously and steer strategies; the implementation and scaling up of promising measures; and a community based approach across the country’s 30 districts. Rwanda is achieving progress through advocacy, leveraging funds to support implementation of multi-sectoral district plans informed by reliable nutrition information systems. In ten years, the country has seen stunting rates drop from 51% in 2005 to 38% in 2015.

Uganda Case study download pdf

Despite sustained economic growth and poverty reduction over the past 20 years in Uganda, levels of chronic undernutrition (stunting) have persisted with just a nominal decline over the same period. Stunting (children who are short for their age) still affects one in three children in Uganda. This represents 2.4 million children in Uganda, which now ranks 14th globally by the number of children affected. Besides stunting, micro-nutrient deficiency is also high (lack of vitamins and minerals, also known as “hidden-hunger”): one in two children and one in four women suffer from iron-deficiency anaemia; and one in five children and women of reproductive age are deficient in vitamin A. Undernutrition is particularly linked to poor households with limited access to safe water sources, poor sanitation facilities and children whose mothers had little or no education.

DTAA-COMESA FORUM

THE PATHFINDER FORUM FOR COMESA DTAs “Paving the road for COMESA cross-border investment” WHY DTAA’s ARE IMPORTANT?

Double taxation arises when income is taxed in more than one country.

  • Double Taxation Agreements avoid or at least mitigate against that double taxation and have been shown to strongly promote cross-border investment and trade.
  • DTAs greatly assist in the prevention of tax discrimination against interests abroad
  • These agreements are increasingly a major factor in decisions relating to location of investment and resultant trade development, playing a key role in the negotiation of optimum long term economic benefit from trade deal prospects for developing countries.
  • They are also important and positive components in vital private sector driven positive investment promotion and trade stimulus strategies to maximise economic growth in the COMESA region.
  • Furthermore, DTAs can greatly assist the realisation opportunities to maximise the large scale economic regional integration benefits through the emerging dynamics of the Tripartite Free Trade Area.

COMESA Brochure download pdf

# Multimedia production services including video recording of the Forum and post -production of multilingual video by Jose Bascon https://www.linkedin.com/in/josebascon 

# Event organization fully carried out by Goska Zuchowska https://www.linkedin.com/in/goskazuchowska

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Commonwealth Business Forum

#Brochure#  download pdf

Commonwealth Business Forum (CBF) in 2009 focused the eyes of the Commonwealth and international business community on the CARICOM region. The Forum was organized by the Commonwealth Business Council (CBC) in cooperation with Caribbean business leaders, and the National Secretariat, Office of the Prime Minister, Government of Trinidad and Tobago. The CBF was a significant public private dialogue around economic issues to open up new opportunities for investment and for doing business.

# Multimedia production services including video recording of the Forum and post -production of multilingual video by Jose Bascon https://www.linkedin.com/in/josebascon 

# Event organization fully carried out by Goska Zuchowska https://www.linkedin.com/in/goskazuchowska


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Action Plan on nutrition

Action Plan download pdf

Recognising that under nutrition poses a major global challenge the EU adopted in March 2013 the Communication: “Enhancing Maternal and Child Nutrition in External Assistance: An EU Policy Framework”. The related Council Conclusions of May 20132, welcomed this Communication and invited the Commission to develop an Action Plan setting out how the Commission will deliver on its stunting target. Therefore, this Action Plan focuses particularly on one commitment   to reduce the number of stunted children under the age of five years by at least 7 million by the year 2025. The Action Plan identifies how the Commission can work to improve nutrition at the national, regional and international levels, identifying the elements necessary for a more effective and accountable response to the fight against under nutrition. More specific actions are defined country by country in the National Indicative Programmes for the 2014-2020 programming period.

Agriculture and Nutrition: a common future

Agriculture and Nutrition download pdf

In the last few years a broad international consensus has emerged that reducing malnutrition is one of the major challenges of the 21st century. While progress has been made in reducing stunting (from 253 million in 1990 to 165 million in 2011) and wasting (from 58 million in 1990 to 52 million in 2011) in children, under-nutrition continues to hinder nations’ economic advancement by at least 8%1, putting a heavy burden on achieving sustainable development goals. Globally, 2 billion people continue to suffer from deficiencies in micronutrients such as iron, zinc and vitamin A. While the consequences of under-nutrition are alarming, the prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing dramatically, leading to a much higher incidence of non-communicable diseases.

Key facts
Approximately one in four children under five is stunted
and under-nutrition kills more than 3 million children every year.
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Over 2 billion people are deficient in key vitamins and minerals because of low dietary diversity.
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One in 15 children less than five years of age (in total some 43 million) is overweight.
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The prevalence of wasting (acute under-nutrition) has also declined,
yet 19 million babies are born each year with a low birth weight.

The future of (ASEM) the Asia-Europe Meeting

ASEM Report download pdf

For nearly two decades ASEM has played a key role as a forum for dialogue and cooperation connecting Asia and Europe. ASEM’s value and continuing importance in today’s politics, diplomacy, and inter-regional relations is uncontested. Yet, as an (informal) institution ASEM is destined to evolve along with a transforming global environment. Since its inception in 1996 the forum has changed significantly. It has enlarged substantially, adapting itself to an increasingly multipolar world, an expanding European Union, and a progressively more interdependent Asian region. As for substance, the process is now covering much more ground, reflecting newly emerging global challenges that Asia and Europe need to tackle together. Furthermore, ASEM has taken incremental steps to strengthen coordination, and to translate the informal dialogue process into tangible outcomes and common policies. Nevertheless, ahead of ASEM’s third decade, it is clear that opinions are divided on the future direction of the forum. Tension exists between often all too high expectations and the forum’s limited capabilities. A gap can be perceived between those emphasizing the informal dialogue process, and those seeking to increase concrete joint endeavors.

The renewal of the ACP-EU partnership agreement: Issues for the EU in consultation phase 1

Video recording and Note Taker of 7 roundtables around a set of clusters in the following cities: Brussels, The Hague, Bonn, Paris, Luxembourg, London and Riga by José Bascon

Post-production of 7 video clips and 7 long videos that will be used to animate the internet based consultation process, which will comprise a follow-up phase to this study by José Bascon

The renewal of the ACP-EU partnership agreement: Issues for the EU in consultation phase 1

The Cotonou Partnership Agreement (CPA) is the latest milestone in the EU’s relations with the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries. Originating in the Yaoundé Convention adopted in 1964, these relations reflected the European Communities (EC) member states’ determination to maintain strong and special links with a group of former overseas territories or colonies of several of the founding Member States, which had become independent after the Treaty of Rome of 1957. With the accession of the United Kingdom to the EC in 1973, the time was ripe to formalise these relations in a more institutionalised partnership. The 1975 Georgetown Agreement gave legal personality to the ACP Group, thus paving the way for the ratification of the first Lomé Convention the same year.

The overall objective of the project was to gather a critical mass of expertise to stimulate a wider discussion on post-Cotonou issues, and define issues at stake notably for the time horizon 2020-2030. This was done in the form of expert roundtables around a set of clusters as described in more detail below:

Cluster 1: What kind of partnership do we want?
The EU and the ACP countries have built a strong relationship over the past 50 years. 2020 is an opportunity to reflect on what the EU wants to achieve with its partner countries. The aspiration is to combine a thorough understanding of the EU’s strategic partnerships, the historic relationship with the ACP countries and the “Cotonou acquis”.

Cluster 2: Future framework for international cooperation and development policy
The post-2015 international development agenda, a framework that is intended to be universal, will obviously impact on the post-2020 EU-ACP relationship. Taking into account international commitments and objectives, what is the scope for a revised CPA to provide added value?

Cluster 3: Means of implementation

What resources are required for a revised Cotonou agreement, for what purpose and what could be their source? What would be the implications of a “budgetisation” of the EDF? How can the predictability of funds continue to be secured? The international debate on financing for development should also be kept in mind.

Cluster 4: Stakeholders and institutions
Building on a thorough understanding of the current stakeholders and institutional framework, its strengths and weaknesses, the cluster will assess the political economy of the partnership. What lessons are to be learned from the performance of current arrangements? What might be the best institutional architecture for a revised partnership with a specific group of developing countries?

Cluster 5: Regional integration and trade
Trade relations between the EU and ACP countries now fall within the remit of the EPAs and are dealt with by regional groupings. Regional integration is indeed prolific among the ACP countries, with several regional fora and an overarching ACP group. The EU also has distinct relationships (based in two cases on strategies) with each of the three geographical regions (Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific). Choices need to be made to streamline the sets of relations the EU has with all these interlocutors.

Cluster 6: Global challenges
What are the global challenges that affect both the ACP countries and the EU? Is there a role for the partnership to act together on a number of selected global issues, both locally and/or at global level?

Cluster 7: Demographic developments
Demographic developments in ACP countries and in the EU are leading to massively different age structures and population dynamics. Forecasts predict that urbanisation and people’s mobility will remain long-lasting phenomena. Innovative provisions should be sought to tackle these issues effectively and ensure that the new cooperation framework between the EU and ACP countries addresses the real drivers of development.

Babel Imagen was assigned:

  • the design and development of the visibility tools 
  • video recording of 7 roundtables around a set of clusters in the following cities: Brussels, The Hague, Bonn, Paris, Luxembourg, London and Riga. Those recordings are the basis upon which the cluster leaders will write the roundtable reports. Post-production of 7 video clips and 7 long videos that will be used to animate the internet based consultation process, which will comprise a follow-up phase to this study.
  • roundtables organization

# Multimedia production services including video recording of the roundtables and video post -production by Jose Bascon https://www.linkedin.com/in/josebascon 

# Logistics organization carried out by Goska Zuchowska https://www.linkedin.com/in/goskazuchowska

ACP-EU folder

 

Herebelow some samples of discussions during the roundtables


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We can overcome undernutrition: Guatemala Case Study

Project: Nutrition Technical Assistance and Advisory Services. ACP countries, Asia, Gulf countries, East Africa, Europe (non-EU), Latin America, Mediterranean partners

Guatemala shows an unprecedented national movement legal, political and institutional towards making the fight against chronic undernutrition a top State commitment for human development and poverty reduction. The 2012 Zero Hunger Pact1 sets to reduce 10% of child stunting by end 2015 and its operational plan provides the accountability framework.

With 1 out of 2 children in Guatemala stunted,chronic undernutrition is the most serious problem afflicting the nation and carries strong negative effects on human capital and economic productivity. Clearly, putting an end to this scourge in the long term will require significant additional support. Not only Guatemala’s progress against global WHA targets for stunting and anaemia remain off course, but the country faces emerging problems of obesity and chronic diseases.

In line with EC’s Nutrition Action Plan, the EU and Member States in Guatemala are firmly committed to supporting Governmentled efforts to reduce undernutrition by maintaining a strategic focus of investments in the food security and nutrition sector. In the past six years (2009-2015), EC’s budget support for implementing the plan of the Zero Hunger Pact proved crucial to sustain institutions responsible for nutrition across two governmental mandates and to mobilize national spending on nutrition, policy commitment and governance. In the years ahead, the focus will be in supporting national policy related to food security and nutrition, Zero Hunger Pact implementation and accountability therein, prioritizing both improved healthcare, small scale farming and livelihood support all of which are components of the Zero Hunger Pact.

Babel Imagen developed the cataloque for the project activity.

Guatemala Case Study

We can overcome undernutrition: Ethiopia Case Study

Project: Nutrition Technical Assistance and Advisory Services. ACP countries, Asia, Gulf countries, East Africa, Europe (non-EU), Latin America, Mediterranean partners

Ethiopia is the second-most populous country in Africa with a population of 87 million. In just over 20 years Ethiopia has reduced the prevalence of stunting (chronic undernutrition) in children under-five years of age from 67% to 40%. No other country in Africa has matched this achievement, although few have started from such a low base. This has been a major contributing factor to Ethiopia’s impressive performance in reducing child mortality1. However, even if this trend continues, Ethiopia will still fall short of its own commitment to reduce

stunting to 20% by 2020. 40% prevalence of stunting is still above the sub-Saharan average and in absolute numbers represents today about 6 million children.

As part of the European Commission’s commitment to reduce globally the number of stunted children by seven million by 2025, the EU Delegation has chosen nutrition as the core theme through which to collaborate with the many Member States represented in Ethiopia to support government-led efforts. Particular attention will focus on mainstreaming nutrition into its support to flagship programmes, such as the Agricultural Growth Programme (AGPII), the Productive Safety Net Programme (PSNP4), supporting interventions such as
RESET (Resilience in Ethiopia), which link humanitarian and development interventions from a resilience perspective, and enhanced nutrition governance and accountability.

Babel Imagen developed the catalogue for the project activity.

Ethiopia Case Study